Immigrants from Haiti represent a small but growing share of the total foreign-born population in the United States, tripling in number between 1990 and 2012. Haitian migration to the United States was very small several decades ago, with the population estimated at approximately 5,000 in 1960. Haitians began arriving in the United States in larger numbers after Haiti descended into chaos following the collapse of the Duvalier dictatorship in the late 1980s. The Haitian immigrant population stood at 606,000 in 2012, up from 200,000 in 1990; Haitians now constitute 1.5 percent of the total U.S. foreign-born population. 

Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, Form and Fee Information

Purpose:

To establish your relationship to a relative who wishes to immigrate to the United States.

Who May File or Receive Service:

U.S. citizens residing in this office's jurisdiction filing on behalf of their spouse, unmarried child under the age of 21 or parent (if the U.S. citizen is 21 years of age or older).

U.S. citizens residing in this field office's jurisdiction but outside of Haiti may file with the U.S. Embassy or Consulate having jurisdiction over the U.S. citizen's place of residence if the USCIS Port-au-Prince field office director determines that there are exceptional circumstances.

Active Duty Military: Active duty U.S. military service members stationed permanently at a military base in USCIS Port-au-Prince's jurisdiction but outside of Haiti may file this form directly with the Department of State without needing to establish exceptional circumstances.

Filing and Other Special Instructions:Residents of Haiti filing with USCIS Port-au-Prince may submit the petition and supporting evidence in person.Evidence of residency must be submitted with the petition. The evidence you submit must support a determination that you are a resident in Haiti.Please Note: Certain pieces of evidence may more strongly support a finding of residency than others. For petitions filed at this field office, you must submit one or more of the following:Passport entry stamp(s)Residency permit or cardWork permitHousing leaseWork contractIn addition, other evidence of residency may include, but is no limited to:Utility billsProof of local registrationMilitary ordersBank statementsProof of school enrollmentVehicle registrationValid local driver's licenseTax documentsForeign property deeds or registration (although proof of property ownership in itself, may be insufficient if there is no evidence that the petitioner resides at that property)Any document issued in a foreign language must be accompanied by a full English translation and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. The original documents, with one copy of the originals, and the English translation should be submitted with the petition. Any original documents submitted upon USCIS' request will be returned.If you live outside of Haiti, but believe that exceptional circumstances justify filing your petition overseas, please go to the nearest U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate to make your request to file. You must provide evidence of exceptional circumstances. The consular section will contact the field office director to request permission to accept your petition overseas. If your request is denied, you will need to file with the Chicago Lockbox.Petitions from lawful permanent residents and petitions for relatives of U.S. citizens other than those mentioned in the "Who May File or Receive Service" section must be filed with the Chicago Lockbox..

I-130, Petition for Alien Relative

Purpose of Form

For citizen or lawful permanent resident of the United States to establish the relationship to certain alien relatives who wish to immigrate to the United States.
Note: A separate form must be filed for each eligible relative. USCIS processes Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, as a visa number becomes available. Filing and approval of an I-130 is only the first step in helping a relative immigrate to the United States. Eligible family members must wait until there is a visa number available before they can apply for an immigrant visa or adjustment of status to a lawful permanent resident.

Number of Pages

Form 2; Instructions 7.

Edition Date

03/23/15. Previous editions accepted.

Where to File

File at the Chicago or Phoenix Lockbox, depending on where you live and whether you are also filing Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. The addresses are listed here: Direct Filing Addresses for Form I-130 web page.

If you reside outside of the United States where USCIS has an international office, you may file at the USCIS Chicago Lockbox facility or at the USCIS international office in the country in which you reside. If you reside outside of the United States where USCIS does not have an international office, you may file at the U.S. Embassy or consulate having jurisdiction over the area where you live only if exceptional circumstances exist and the USCIS Field Office Director with jurisdiction over that location determines that the Embassy or consulate may accept and adjudicate the case. For a list of USCIS international offices and filing instructions please visit www.uscis.gov/international.

Filing Fee

$420

Special Instructions

  • Please read our Lockbox Filing Tips.
  • To receive an email or text message when we accept your form, complete Form G-1145, E-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance and clip it to the front of the petition.
  • If you are filing for your spouse, your petition must be accompanied by a Biographical Form G-325A for you and one for your spouse (not form G-325).
  • For your petition to be accepted, you must:
    • Properly sign the form. As the petitioner, you must sign Part E.
    • Submit the correct filing fee of $420.
    • Complete the entire form. You must complete Part A. You must provide your name, complete address, marital status, and country of birth in Part B; and the beneficiary's name, complete address, marital status, and country of birth in Part C.
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Haiti - USCIS Port-au-Prince Field Office

Geographic Jurisdiction

USCIS Port-au-Prince is in the Latin America, Canada and the Caribbean District and has jurisdiction over U.S. immigration matters in the French-speaking islands of the West Indies. The islands include: Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Barthelemy and St. Martin.

Public hours

Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For general information or to check on the status of your case, you must contact the USCIS office, by phone, Monday through Friday between 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. The office is closed on Haitian and American holidays.

Appointments

You do not need an appointment to visit USCIS Port-au-Prince, but you may make one by contacting us.

Walk-Ins

USCIS Port-au-Prince accepts walk-ins. Walk-ins are served on a first come, first served basis. Note: Transportation Letter requests are only accepted on Mondays through Thursdays and are issued on the same day, which must be the day of travel to the United States.

Fee Payment Information

The fees for all applications and petitions submitted to this office must be paid at the Consulate's Cashier in U.S. dollars or credit cards.

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Sante Nou se yon nouvo fason pou pote swen sante an Ayiti

pou jwen swen, Rele fanmi ou nan peyi Etazini pou ba ou aksè a swen an Ayiti.